Gregory Freia 30

Priced: $64.47 - $139.00 Rated:   - 3 stars out of 5 by 1 review.
Gregory Freia 30
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Color: Egyptian Blue
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Backcountry.com $64.47
52% off
Regularly: $135.63
Gearx $69.99
48% off
Regularly: $129.00
Rocky Mountain Trail $82.90
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Regularly: $135.63
Moosejaw $82.99 - $103.99
38% off
Regularly: $135.63
Sierra Trading Post $94.95
29% off
Regularly: $135.63
Campsaver.com $104.21
23% off
Regularly: $138.95
Rock/Creek Outfitters $110.95
18% off
Regularly: $138.95
Mountain Gear $129.00
4% off
Regularly: $135.63
eBags.com $129.00
4% off
Regularly: $135.63
Paragon Sports $139.00
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Gregory Freia 30 -

Looking for something to hold all your outdoor goodies without all the excess bulk of a big hiking pack? Here's the solution.
Built specifically for females, the Freia 30 lets you stay nimble and carry what you need for those fast and light pursuits. The perfect pack for peak-baggers everywhere.
How to Properly Fit a Gregory Pack

Collar:

  • Spindrift collar with drawcord closure

Support and Cushioning:

  • Women's-specific design delivers anatomically correct support and stability

Zippers:

  • Zip internal and external lid pockets

Pockets:

  • Large side pockets
  • Top pocket with internal security compartment
  • Front bucket pocket

Lining and Layers:

  • Reversed top-loading main access for clean lines and easy use

Fit:

  • Women-specific fit with narrower back panel

Fabric:

  • Durable and lightweight 210 Dynajin and 420 nylon materials
  • Kinetic FTS (Flexible Transfer System) eliminates the need for a rigid stay by using breathable, semi-rigid materials in the back panel and waist belt

Padding:

  • Breathable split channel padded shoulder straps with elastic hydration tube retainer and quick-access pockets

Ventilation:

  • Highly breathable split channel harness and waistbelt
  • Breathable mesh backpanel with center channel vents
  • Kinetic FTS (Flexible Transfer System) breathable suspension features anatomical back panel with center channel ventilation

Hydration:

  • Hydration pocket (bladder not included) with dual exit ports

Manufactured:

  • Made in Philippines

Straps:

  • Side compression straps with reflective trim
  • Adjustable sternum strap
  • Pliable shoulder straps and waist belt facilitate unrestricted movement

Features:

  • Cannot ship to South Korea.
  • Lightweight aluminum strut above the harness offers stability for heavier loads without compromising flexibility
  • Reverse top lid design provides easy access to main compartment
  • Dual ice axe/trekking pole attachment points
Mountain Gear
The Freia 30 pack from Gregory is a great daypack for longer days on the trail.

Moosejaw
FEATURES of the Gregory Women's Freia 30 Pack.

Sierra Trading Post
The Gregory Freia 30 backpack helps you stay light on your feet while you tackle technical terrain. The reversed top-loading design provides easy access to the main compartment, and the Kinetic FTS suspension includes a highly breathable waistbelt, shoulder straps and back panel.

Backcountry.com
The Gregory Freia 30 Backpack hauls everything you need for an all-day summit trip without excess bulk to hold you back. Plenty of streamlined storage space combined with a lightweight, flexible suspension system equals second-skin comfort during epic out-and-backs.
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Access Type :Reversed top-loading main access
Adjustable Torso Length:No
Backpack Features:Top Loader
Backpack Style:Technical Daypack
Capacity:1709 cu in / 28 L (XS); 1831 cu in / 30 L (S); 1953 cu in / 32 L (M)
Detachable Pack:no
Dimensions (HxWxD):22x10-1/2x6"
Fits torsos:18-20"
Helmet Carrier:yes
Hydration Bladder Included:Not Included
Hydration Compatible:Yes
Ice Axe Loops:yes
Laptop Pocket :No
Laptop Sleeve:None
Length:[XS: 14-16"] ; [S: 16-18"] ; [M: 18-20"]
Material:Durable and lightweight 210 Dynajin and 420 nylon materials
Max Load Capacity:25 lb / 12 kg
Number of Pockets:4
Organization Pocket:no
Pack Size:1000-1999 cu in
Pockets:Yes
Primary Access:Top Access
Shovel Pocket:yes
Ski / Snowboard Carrier:no
Sleeping Bag Compartment:no
Suspension:Internal Frame
Torso Length:(Medium) 18" - 20"
Trekking Pole Loops:yes
Volume:[XS: 1709 cu in / 28L] ; [S: 1831 cu in / 30L] ; [M: 1953 cu in / 32L]
Weight:[XS: 2 lbs 0 oz / 906g] ; [S: 2 lbs 2 oz / 962g] ; [M: 2 lbs 4 oz / 1.02kg]
Compare specifications to related products.

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Subcategories of Backpacks, Daypacks & Bags:

Gregory Freia 30 Review:

Reviews:

I just got this pack in the spring and have used it regularly. The pack is fairly lighweight and feels pretty good when filled completely. I use this for day hikes and also as a work field pack. I'm not a huge fan of how the lid opens from the opposite way (the back of the pack) than traditional packs with lids. Also, I find the waist belt isn't easily adjustable. You have to fidget with it, not like the usual waist straps where you can easily pull the webbing with one hand to tighten even as you are hiking or going along. Only one side is adjustable, the side with the male end of the buckle. You have to feed the strap through sections at a time through another webbing rigging piece before it fully adjusts. I like the big side mesh pockets for throwing things in on the whim, but the mesh is already tearing a bit from the top where it is sewn into the stretchy pocket. Little disappointed with this pack as I have a Gregory Deva 60 from 2003/2004 that is still solid with a lot of use. Luckily I won this pack at a raffle and will keep using it til it falls apart. Hopefully not too soon!

GoodGuinness at Backcountry.com on 10/02/2012