MSR Dragonfly

Priced: $129.95 - $139.95 Rated:   - 5 stars out of 5 by 176 reviews.
MSR Dragonfly - MSR DragonFly Camping Stove - The Dragonfly liquid-fuel camp stove has precision-simmering can take many different fuels. The Dragonfly camping stove is super tough and stable, it excels in institutional and guide service settings. Its dual-valve design gives you the exellent flame control. One of the fastest working, and crowd pleasing camp stoves on the market. The MSR Dragonfly stove cant be beat.

Fit:

  • Folds to 1/3 of its working size, fitting into MSR's 2 liter pot for easy storage
  • Legs spring open for ease of use and fold compactly for storage—fits inside MSR cook sets, sold separately

Lining and Layers:

  • The Dragonfly pump has a safety feature that other MSR stoves do not have. It prevents fuel from rapidly escaping fuel line connection in the event the stove is turned off by the simmer valve and seperated from the stove without shutting off pump!

Support and Cushioning:

  • Three wide pot supports hold larger (up to 9" maximum diameter) pots or fry pans for group cooking

Weather and Wind:

  • Of course, when the need arises to melt snow and brew up fast, the DragonFly goes from zero to searing at the twist of a knob

Manufactured:

  • Made in USA

Features:

  • Its dual-valve design gives you the flame control you need for evenly heating large pots of crowd-pleasing gruel
  • The suspended burner cup enables the stove to burn hot and strong while reducing heat lost to the ground
  • Lightweight pump is easy to adjust and is durable
  • Pump features a poppet valve so it won't leak when you remove it from the stove after cooking
  • Burns almost any fuel, including white gas, kerosene, diesel, automotive gas, aviation gas, stoddard solvent and naphtha
  • CoolFuel Valve First ever dual-valve design offers an unrivaled range of flame control simmer to boil with a twist of the flame adjuster.
  • The safety device also prevents fuel leaks from accidental valve opening when packed. Read instructions regarding depressurizing fuel bottle.
  • Weight of liquid fuel stove includes only stove and fuel pump
  • Stainless steel aluminum
  • Clean out jet debris for high performance with a flick of the wrist
  • Includes fuel pump, small parts kit, windscreen, heat reflector, carry bag and instructions
  • Field-maintainable stove stays clog-free thanks to its self-cleaning jet
  • Shaker Jet technology and smart engineering allows complete cleaning and maintenance in the field
  • Pioneered by MSR, the separate fuel bottle and pump keep the flame away from the fuel, which allows the use of a windscreen to make the stove burn hotter and more efficiently
  • Tough and stable, it excels in institutional and guide service settings
  • Multi-Fuel
  • Fuel bottle not included
  • MSR DragonFly backpacking stove requires MSR fuel bottle for operation, sold separately
  • Comes with windscreen, heat reflector, fuel pump and stuff sack; windscreen is designed to accommodate cookware up to 10 in. in diameter
  • Package Includes
  • Wt. 17 oz (481.9 g)
SunnySports
MSR DragonFly Stove Features.

MSR DragonFly Stove.
Enjoy good meals out in the great outdoors with this MSR DragonFly Stove. This stove from MSR comes with a dual-valve design that lets you adjust the flame to fit your needs. It is very lightweight, allowing you to take it on all your adventures with ease. Its three wide pot supports are capable of holding larger MSR pots despite its small size. It provides you with enough power to cook and heat up your food very fast. This very impressive little stove can burn white gas, kerosene, and unleaded auto fuel. It can boil water for coffee, soup, or other uses in about 3.5 minutes. Plus, you can easily fold it to about a third of its size so that it takes up very little room anywhere that you pack it. Enjoy your time out in the great outdoors a lot more with this MSR DragonFly Stove.
This product can only be shipped to U.S. addresses.

Key Features.

TahoeMountainSports.com
The MSR DragonFly stove has won numerous awards for its innovative dual-valve design, which offers an unrivaled range of continuous and immediate flame control.
Simmer a delicate sauce over a candle flame or melt snow quickly over a blowtorch with a twist of the flame adjuster.
CoolFuel Valve: The first ever dual-valve design offers an unrivaled range of flame control from simmer to boil.
Three wide pot supports hold larger MSR pots or fry pans for gourmet cooking.
Multi-Fuel: Burns white gas, kerosene, unleaded auto fuel, diesel, and jet fuel.
Compact: Folds to one-third of its working size for easy storage.
Remote Burner: Pioneered by MSR, the separate fuel bottle and pump keep the flame away from the fuel, which allows the use of a windscreen to make the stove burn hotter and more efficiently.
Self-Cleaning Shaker Jet: Clean out jet debris for high performance with a flick of the wrist.
Suspended Burner Cup: The suspended burner cup enables the stove to burn hot and strong while reducing heat lost to the ground.
A dependable camping stove from MSR Gear.

Backcountry.com
Simmer a temperamental sauce over a small flame or quickly melt snow over the torch-like setting on MSR's DragonFly Stove. This compact, liquid-fuel stove covers all your camping stove needs. MSR's dual-valve design provides a wide range of flame control. The DragonFly Stove supports larger pots or frying pans for any gourmet cooking you attempt on car-camping trips or overnight backpacking adventures. The DragonFly Stove runs on a variety of fuels, as well, which enables you to slay the hunger dragons quickly. Fold this camping stove into a two-liter MSR pot for easy, safe storage. *Fuel sold separately.

FontanaSports.com
The Dragonfly stove takes precision-simmering performance and puts it in a chassis that’s built to handle a variety of fuels and the frequent use dished-out by global vagabonds. Tough and stable, it also excels in institutional and guide service settings, easily handling pots up to 10 inches in diameter. Its dual-valve design delivers the flame control you need for simmering sauces, and goes from zero to searing at the twist of a knob for melting snow and brewing-up fast. Made in the USA.

Features:
• CoolFuel Valve: First ever dual-valve design offers an unrivaled range of flame control—simmer to boil with a twist of the flame adjuster.
• Extra Wide Pot Supports: Three wide pot supports hold larger MSR pots or fry pans for gourmet cooking.
: Burns white gas, kerosene, unleaded auto fuel, diesel, and jet fuel.
: Folds to 1/3 of its working size for easy storage.
• Remote Burner: Pioneered by MSR, the separate fuel bottle and pump keep the flame away from the fuel, which allows the use of a windscreen to make the stove burn hotter and more efficiently.
• Self-Cleaning Shaker Jet: Clean out jet debris for high performance with a flick of the wrist.
• Suspended Burner Cup: The suspended burner cup enables the stove to burn hot and strong while reducing heat lost to the ground.
• Fuel Bottle Sold Separately.
• Minimum Weight: 14 oz / 395 g.
• Packed Weight: 1 lbs 2 oz / 510 g.
• Country of Origin: Made in Seattle, USA


Appalachain Outdoors
Compact, lightweight, and very strong, the MSR DragonFly Stove is the world's first multi-fuel stove with an adjustable flame. FEATURES: Innovative CoolFuel Valve features a dual-valve design that offers an unrivaled range of continuous and immediate flame control. Go from simmer to boil with just a twist of the flame adjuster with dual-valve design. Three wide pot supports hold larger pots or fry pans so gourmet chefs can do their magic in the backcountry. Separate fuel bottle and pump keep the flame away from the fuel, which allows the use of a windscreen to make the stove burn hotter and more efficiently. Self-cleaning shaker jet allows you to clean out jet debris for high performance with a flick of the wrist. Liquid-fuel stove design saves on weight, provides superior cold-temperature performance and delivers greater fuel economy. Only to be used with MSR Fuel Bottles (sold separately).
SummitHut.com

In a world that expects liquid-fuel stoves to have one setting (hot), the DragonFly stands out. Since its debut in 1998, it has won numerous awards for its innovative dual-valve design, which offers an unrivaled range of continuous and immediate flame control. Simmer a delicate sauce over a candle flame or melt snow quickly over a blowtorch with a twist of the flame adjuster. The continued popularity and performance of the DragonFly can be attributed to the many features invented by MSR. (Fuel canister sold separately).


Campmor
A multi-fuel expedition stove with a fully adjustable flame, from a slow simmer to a rolling boil. Burns kerosene, white gas, aviation gas, naptha, auto gas, diesel #1 and Stoddard solvent. Self cleaning shaker jet. Boils 1 quart of water in under 3.5 minutes, with white gas, just under 4 minutes with kerosene. Burn time 126 minutes (white gas) 153 minutes (kerosene) with a 22 oz. bottle. Windscreen and heat reflector included. Folds to fit inside your cookset. Bottle not included. Stuff sack is included.
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Average Price History: Price History
Review RatingNumber of Reviews
110
46
9
3
8
1 Liter Boil Time:3.5 min
2 control valves:1 to regulate gas flow and another to dial-in a precise flame
Activity:Backpacking
Auto ignition:No
Average boil time:(White gas) 3 min. 30 sec. / (kerosene) 3 min. 54 sec.
Boil Time:White Gas - 3.5 minutes
Boil time, 1 liter (diesel):3.5 minutes
Boil time, 1 liter (kerosene):3.9 minutes
Boil time, 1 liter (white gas):3.5 minutes
Burn Time:126 min. (600 ml white gas)
Burn time (max flame):(20 oz. of fuel) (White gas) 2 hrs. 6 min. / (kerosene) 2 hrs. 33 min.
Burn time 20 oz. bottle of white gas:126 minutes
Burn time per 20 oz. bottle of diesel:136 minutes
Burn time per 20 oz. bottle of kerosene:153 minutes
Compact:Folds to 1/3 of its working size and fits in a two-liter MSR pot for easy storage.
CoolFuel™ Valve:First ever dual-valve design offers an unrivaled range of flame control – simmer to boil with a twist of the flame adjuster.
Country of Origin:USA
Dimensions:3.5 in. x 5 in. x 6.25 in. (8.9 cm x 14.7 cm x 15.8 cm)
Efficient:Suspended burner cup enables the stove to burn hot and strong while reducing heat lost to the ground
Extra Wide Pot Supports:Wide pot supports hold up to 10" maximum diameter pots or fry pans for group cooking
Field Maintainable:Shaker Jet™ technology and smart engineering allow complete cleaning and maintenance in the field.
Fuel:White gas / kerosene / jet / auto / diesel
Fuel Connector:Brand Specific Fuel Bottle
Fuel Type:Aviation Fuel, Diesel Gas, Kerosene, Unleaded Gas, White Gas
Fuel Types:Kerosene, white gas, aviation gas, naptha, auto gas, diesel #1 and Stoddard solvent
Ignition Method:Manual
Includes:Fuel pump, windscreen, heat reflector, small-parts kit, instructions, and stuff sack. (Fuel bottle not included.)
Material:Steel and Aluminum
Minimum Weight:14 oz. or 395g
Multi-Fuel:Burns white gas, kerosene, unleaded auto fuel, diesel, and jet fuel.
Packaged Weight:18 oz. or 510g
Priming:Yes
Self-Cleaning Shaker Jet:Clean out jet debris for high performance with a flick of the wrist.
Stove Type:Liquid Fuel Stoves
Suspended Burner Cup:The suspended burner cup enables the stove to burn hot and strong while reducing heat lost to the ground.
Trail Weight:14 oz
Type:Liquid Fuel
Unrivaled Flame Control:MSR pioneered the dual-valve design of the Dragonfly stove, enabling it to deliver precision, simmer-to-boil control.
Upc, Ean, Isbn:040818117743
Water boiled per 1 fl. oz. of kerosene:1.7 liters
Water boiled per 1 fl. oz. of white gas:1.6 liters
Water boiled per 1 oz. of diesel:1.7 liters
Weight:(Stove and pump only) 14 ounces
Windscreen Included:Yes
Compare specifications to related products.

Similar Products:

MSR DragonFly Multi-Fuel StoveMSR DragonFly Multi-Fuel Stove$139.95 - $139.99
MSR Dragonfly Stove PumpMSR Dragonfly Stove Pump$34.95 - $35.00
MSR Dragonfly Expedition KitMSR Dragonfly Expedition Kit$29.95
MSR DragonFly Pump AssemblyMSR DragonFly Pump Assembly$34.95

Subcategories of Stoves & Fuel:

MSR Dragonfly Reviews:

Positive Reviews:

Great Stove

I had one of these stoves a few years back, but I lost it after owning it for just a few months. It was a great stove, I was sorry to see it go! Here's what I liked most about it:1. Controllability - you could REALLY dial in the exact heat control you wanted. I could dial it all the way down to a mere fraction of 1 candlepower!! I mean you could really crank this puppy down to the ultra-low simmer if needed. Conversely, if you needed quick heat then just open her up and it's a veritable blast furnace.2. Lightness - this is a light and compact stove, it breaks down to a pretty small unit for what it can do. Great for backpacking.3. Great cold weather performance. As with most pressurized liquid fuel stoves this one can put out all the heat you could want even when the temps dip below the 30 deg F mark (about 0 deg C). The butane/propane canister stoves will lose pressure (after their fuel cylinders frost over from decompressing during cooking) and hence lose their ability to hold a strong flame. (although coleman makes a model that runs the butane tank upside down that apparently helps with this issue)This stove won't do that, so it's a good quality to have.4. Fueling options - I only tried white gas and kero in my stove, and it worked perfectly with both (although kero is smelly). But it was nice to know I could load 'er up with just about anything flammable and use it if I had to. That's something you can't do with almost all other stoves - this stove's got 'em beat cold in this department. I was a few miles outside of Sequoia Forest in California a few months ago on a last minute trip to sleep amongst the giant trees. I had my little gaz butane stove with me, but no canisters (can't bring them on the flight). I stopped at all these little stores (no REI's or fancy outdoor supply stores around, as per usual in situations like that) and none of them had my gaz canisters, they just had the usual assortment of white gasoline, the standard heavy coleman propane bottles and maybe the coleman butane canisters which wouldn't fit my gaz stove (french made I believe). If I had a liquid stove I would have been dialed in instantly, and even if none of them carried white gas a quick squirt at the gas station would have gotten me by in no time. THAT'S why a liquid multi-fuel stove like this is good (I ended up roasting sausages over the fire that night btw)...but no hot coffee in the AM!5. Stability - This stove has a nice wide burner grill and it sits low to the ground. Very stable and capable of supporting surprisingly large/heavy pots and skillets - especially considering that it is a lightweight backpacking stove! Very well thought out in this regard.Here's what I didn't like about this stove:1. LOUD - Man this thing is like a 747 in takeoff mode at high power. Its burner is very loud, it really is difficult to carry on a convo with someone nearby. I have a Coleman exponent 442 multi-liquid stove (which is nice too) and it is very quiet at high power and outputs comparable heat too.2. $$$$$$ - This stove is expensive! It S*CKS that I lost it!! Need I say more???3. Complicated - Although this stove is easy to use once you get used to it, like all the MSR type liquid fuel stoves it's a bit complicated and cumbersome. You have to remove it from its bag, unfold the legs, plug in the tank, pump it up, go through the lighting procedure etc before you can finally use it. The when you're done reverse the procedure to pack it away again. It also has little bits, wrenches and spare parts that come with it that I could see easily losing somewhere along the line. If you've ever been backpacking for a few days or more, then you know keeping everything organized and "unlost" is easier said than done. Little bits and pieces like what comes with the stove can easily find their way to the land of the lost socks you occasionally see on the side of the road, especially in the dark and especially after you're plum exhausted from a long hike. In comparison I bought a coleman 442 stove (less than half the price of this unit), and it is an integrated stove that comes in one piece. There are no little bits or pieces or a separate tank to connect. It's just a little heavier and maybe just slightly bulkier, but all I do is pull it out, pump her up and away we go. No attaching tanks or losing bits and pieces amongst pebbles, leaves and ants in the middle of the night. Argghh.Anyway that's the long and short of it, overall great stove. It is loud and expensive, but if you've analyzed your needs and this stove fits the bill, then you wont be disappointed. Dragonfly = good stuff from MSR.
CM Dux at REI on 11/11/2007

Top notch stove with many advantages

My family teases me about the fact that I have a very extensive collection of camp stoves. I have bought and used an extensive array of different stoves by different manufacturers, including many models by MSR. I have made these purchases looking for the perfect stove. I haven't found one yet but the DragonFly is definitely my favorite for most of my uses.It is easily adjustable from a simmer so low it will hardly melt butter to blast furnace hot that will boil water in my 6 liter pot in minutes. Many stoves are very vulnerable to being blown out in the wind, especially at low flame. But not the DragonFly, even without the windscreen, which I need to remove for my larger cooking utensils and frying pans. The burner cup design is probably why - the wind just seems to mix the fuel and oxygen better in windy conditions.Getting the stove level is easy and it will hold the largest pot I take into the wilderness camping (a 10 quart stock pot when there several people in the group) without any degree of instability. No other stove short of a 2 burner propane can do that. Incidentally, removing the windscreen, at least partially, to accommodate large pots has not created any problems for me with the fuel bottle/pump getting hot.This stove is as economical on fuel as they come. Perhaps that is because I use it extensively at simmer when the stove seems to use hardly any gas. This is good not so much because of saving money but because of weight and bulk savings: fewer and smaller fuel bottles required for a given trip.Setting the stove up is somewhat more involved and time consuming than many stoves, especially canister stoves. The windscreen supplied by MSR is both a blessing and a curse. A blessing because it does what it is supposed to do - protect against the wind and direct heat more effectively into the pot; a curse because dealing with it while packing and setting it up. I settled for using a 22 oz fuel bottle and wrapping the wind screen around it. The so called heat reflector is also a nuisance to pack without creating creases that make it split.Like many white gas stoves it needs priming. This is easy to do by just opening the fuel valves and letting some gas squirt into the cup. I have chosen to use a sparker used by welders to light my camp stoves. This keeps my fingers a safe distant from the flames. The one I use only weights 3 oz and I have used it for years without even needing to replace the flint yet. More reliable than the stoves that have built-in piezoelectric sparkers.The stove, like all MSR liquid fuel stove is completely and (for me, anyway) easily field maintainable. Something I cannot say for other makes.DisadvantagesThe stove is loud. The pump where the fuel line plugs into it and the fuel line where it plugs into the pump are open to contamination by dirt unless care is taken to cover them in some fashion to keep them clean. MSR doesn't supply any parts to make this easier.I have 2 DragonFly stoves and one of them developed a crack in the pump, which was the old style used when the DragonFly was first released. This crack has not as yet affected the operation of the pump and I am still using it. I do have a replacement new style pump on hand and I like the design better; it is easier to take apart in the field and seems like it ought to be more reliable but I have no long term experience with it yet.My experience with other makes of stoves of similar design have not been as favorable. I thought the Brunton stove with the all metal fuel pump would be the cat's meow for toughness and reliability but that has not proven to be the case. Pumps fail because valves are sticking, plugged filters, plugged fuel lines and pump cups breaking, or more commonly because they don't make a seal because they are dry (usually because they weren't lubricated after sitting for awhile), not because something on the pump breaks. I have struggled so much keeping fuel flowing (plugged line and/or filters) to the burner on the Brunton stove that I have stopped using it even though I love it's compact design. Using a similar burner design it is also loud.In summary, when the size of the group calls for larger pots and the menu includes entrees that need simmering or frying at low temperatures, this the best all-around stove. If the menu is just boiling water for freeze-dried entrees and hot drinks for one or 2, the MSR DragonFly is fully capable but with noise and bulkiness and other stoves offer advantages over the DragonFly in this situation.
mantyman at REI on 09/09/2011

My favorite stove so far!

This is one of my favorite stoves of all time, although it does have some drawbacks...
I love the fine control over the flame and the ability to use pretty much any liquid fuel imaginable, which is a HUGE plus when camping in locations where specialized fuel and canisters are few and far between (overseas, long-range trips, etc). The stove is relatively easy to setup and take down, albeit a bit bulky compared to others. Some may not like having to refill the fuel bottles, but it's usually not a big deal, it comes with the territory. The varying sizes of fuel bottles available will accommodate pretty much any trip, whether it be a overnight, weekend, or week long expedition.

I have heard complaints that the jet will clog up from time to time, but I've only used white gas and kerosene and have had zero problems out of three years of use. With some "dirtier" fuels or fuels that you think might be a bit contaminated or dirty, most people expect that cleaning the jets will become necessary at some point in time. If the shaker mechanism doesn't clean it, it's usually easy to take apart and clean the jet yourself.

I wish the stove were a little easier to pack, but it's more of a basecamp style stove anyways, so if you're packing one around for an expedition or big adventure, you'll usually have a pot or cookset big enough to stick it in. It's great for car camping and basecamps and will do good for weekend trips...just not the easiest thing to pack for all the minimalists out there.

It works perfect for what I've needed it for, my only real gripe other than the bulk, is the noise. That being said, I was warned before I bought the stove, when you really have it cranked up beyond a simmer, it's a bit loud. The thing sounds like a jet engine, it's almost hilarious. However, it is a powerful stove that can boil water extremely quickly, but still able to simmer a stew or cook eggs for breakfast.

Although I think it would take a near hurricane to blow the flame out, it comes with a windshield/barrier that helps keep an even flame as well as facilitate quicker cooking times by reducing the amount of heat lost around the sides. The shield also seems to dampen the sound a bit, which is nice. It also includes a circular shield that goes under the stove with its main purpose being to reflect heat, but it also keeps the stove from scorching the ground underneath.

It seems to be a pretty economical stove to use as well. I have a small 8oz MSR fuel bottle and I've used it for several multi-day or weekend trips and haven't had to refill, and that's cooking breakfast and dinner for 2-3 days.

Bottom line, it's a great stove for bigger/longer trips with several people. Excellent for base-camps and car camping. Not so much for thru-hikers and fastpackers, but there's other stoves in MSR's lineup that are better suited for that style or method of travel. It's loud, but not to the point of being unbearable. Fuel is available pretty much anywhere. SUPER stable and quick to setup. Will operate in the coldest environments and at any altitude. For this style of stove, I highly recommend the Dragonfly!

PS: A few people have heard of the issues MSR had with their earlier fuel pumps breaking and have asked me if I've experienced any problems out of mine. I've never had any issues with mine and I think when MSR changed the design a bit a few years ago along with using a tougher material, they remedied any issues with breakage. Although with any plastic or composite material, extra care should be taken when being used in colder environments as the colder temperature causes it to become brittle and more susceptible to breakage/failure.
thelosthiker at REI on 08/08/2010

Extremly versatile little stove.

This stove is superior to other back packing stoves in many, but not all ways.

This stove will burn the widest variety of fuels that I have seen in a backpacking stove, let alone a car camping stove. Which makes it not only a useful backpacking/camping stove in my opinion, but would also make it a great stove for international trips.

With the other stoves, you are limited on fuels. Especially the Iso/butane stoves(which also create a lot of waste, whether you want to recycle the spent containers or not.

The propane canister stoves, are the biggest waste I can imagine. To thow away those huge one pound Propane cylinders is the ultimate in the lazy, wasteful ways of modern life.

The Dragonfly comes with several jets that allow you to burn anything from Kersosene, Coleman Fuel, to Unleaded gasoline.

The stove has full simmer control, which is a nice feature if you want to cook, instead of just boiling water. You can simmer beans, or turn it up an sear steak.

The shaker design that allows you to clean the stove with that little shaker needle is a pretty cool feature, and should keep it burning in good order.

The stove is said to be, and my experience has lead me to beleive, that the Dragonfly is a very realiable stove.

Another major plus for me, is that the stove is made in the USA. I will go out of my way to buy things made in the united states.

Now that I have expressed the good features about this stove, I should be honest and say, I don't think it is for the non technically inclined.

If you aren't a technical person, I would in fact suggest one of those little Iso/butane stoves that sit on top of those little canesters, or perhaps something else.

On another note, the stove is in fact very loud, it sounds like a small jet engine. It does cut down on enjoyment a little, but in reallity, you aren't going to be cooking all day, so how much of an issue is the noise? Just step away from it...

Lighting the stove is not hard at all, but it requires a little common sense.

This might scare off some. As I said, if you aren't technical, get a more dummy(as in stoves for dummys) friendly stove.

You put fuel in the bottom of the cup, and spill it on the wick, light the fuel, let it burn warming up the stove, and fuel cup, and then slowly turn on the fuel valve, which after it heats, will burn a very clean, blue flame.

Now as for me, I just fired mine up after a year, burning 2 year old Kersosene. It burned nice, hot blue flames and made me a nice cup of coffee. I will try to attach the video, but as always, I can't tell when REI will strip them out, so if it isn't attached, Go to youtube, and type themarkfellows2 to see the video if you wish.
the Mark Fellows II at REI on 05/05/2012

Great group stove for cold weather

I've used this stove for about 4 years and it's my favorite for winter camping due to its flexible heat control, excellent stability with large pots, and long burn time with large fuel bottles. It works very well for large groups of up to 12 where the massive heat output is necessary for hot drinks and real cooking. It makes a great snow melting station since it melts snow quickly and the simmer control keeps the water warm (I often camp with Boy Scouts where there's always someone hungry, thirsty, or both). The ability to simmer opens up the menu to fancier items like real soups and chilis that go down well in the winter. It has excellent stability even with large 3-4 quart pots and kettles. One of these pots, a few folding spatulas and spoons, and the Dragonfly make a great base kitchen set. The optional Trillium folding triangular base plate works well, but in the snow, I also put the stove on a piece of plywood or box lid from a Rubbermaid Action Packer to be safe. It would also work well in one of the haul sleds we use on snowshoeing trips.

It fires off well and has been very reliable even down to subzero temperatures, unlike several other stoves we used "once". Once primed it works just as well as in the summer. For winter camping the 32 oz bottle gives a comfortable reserve; be sure to throw in a generous safety factor compared to summer trips when figuring fuel consumption! On some trips I'll just automatically bring a second bottle in case we get delayed.

Of course, it's loud...however, I've gotten to like the noise since (1) it tells me that we'll be eating soon and (2) everyone knows that the stove is "on". This is important with (hyper)active kids since they reach over/around/besides quiet stoves like my Mini-Trangia alcohol stove or canister stoves; we've had several close calls with quiet stoves but not with the Dragonfly.

My pet peeves are fairly minor in most cases and there's only been one potentially bad experience. It doesn't seem to fold into as small a package as it should and the fuel line on my stove has an odd twist. Kids need to be carefully supervised when priming the stoves, it's common that they don't turn the gas valve off when they move to light the stove. It's a good idea to get the maintenance kit, I've had to field strip and clean the pump in snow. Be sure to do this over a bandanna, box lid, or sled, finding the small white O-ring in the large white snowfield in the middle of the black night is not entirely pleasant. While there are mixed opinions on MSR stove maintenance, I like the idea that I can strip and fix a stove in the field, or better yet, before going.

All in all, I really like the stove for situations with larger groups, communal cooking, or conditions where the stove must fire off and work reliably.
Have Tarp, Will Travel at REI on 10/10/2009

Gourmet travel and backpacking stove

Summary
This stove has terrific flexibility and is durable enough for tough treatment. I discovered its hidden potential when I started baking with it.

Intro and Uses
This was an unnecessary upgrade to my Whisperlite. I got it as a back-up and it turned out to be a replacement. It has a dual valve fuel control which makes for more specialized cooking and even baking. I used it throughout my 2 1/2 month hiking tour of the UK and have used it on numerous overnights and weekenders in the Tetons, Gros Ventres, and Winds as well as 6-7 night trips in the Ozarks and Winds (during both I also used campfires extensively).

Durability
This is a very solid stove that's seen a lot of use with only occassional cleaning. I've mostly used gasoline in it with very little carbon build up. It's fairly easy to take apart and I have replaced one of the pumps. I have an expedition service kit, but haven't needed to replace anything yet. There are more heavy duty stoves out there, but this one should be strong enough for pretty much anyone's needs. My only concern has been the plastic elements, specifically the pump, but I haven't had any serious issues yet.

Efficiency
It's boil time is sufficient. I'm not one of those people who cares about the difference between three minutes and five. If I cared about things like that, I'd stay home and busy myself about schedules and such. At the same time, when I'm hungry in the backcountry, I want to eat now. It gets the job done in a timely manner and as long as you don't view backcountry cuisine like fast food you should be happy. It's got some heft, that's for sure, but I carry this stove because of its gormet potential, its durability, and its flexibility. I don't mind carrying a 17 oz. stove for what I get out of it, as long as I have someone else to help tote the weight. I can boil 1 liter of tap water with 20 grams of gasoline at 6,200 ft., and that's without a fresh cleaning job. That means I can boil 30 liters with a 22 oz. fuel canister. I'm satisfied.

Convenience
It's a good stove for general boiling and cooking, but where it shines is its 'gormet' potential (relatively speaking). If you don't mind burning some fuel, you can also bake. I've baked apple and cherry pies, chocolate and german chocolate cakes, pizza and shephards pie with this stove and my oven kit. It does a great job. I've also made fudge and trail bars. If this little list doesn't suffice to convince everyone that this stove has definitely added to my backcountry and travel experience, then I have failed in this review. I am very happy with this stove and I highly recommend it.
jfnomad at REI on 04/04/2012

LV/SD

I mostly used canister stoves but had some troubles at higher altitudes and cold weather, so I tried a MSR Whisperlight International. It was excellent. Later I moved up to the more expensive Dragonfly. My experience with the Dragonfly was also very positive because it lit easily, was very stable, had great controls, and put out plenty of heat. It was a step up from the Whisperlight in features but it was also slightly more bulky and expensive. I also have an Optimus Nova to compare the Dragonfly to and it does compare well in performance. The quality of the Optimus is better (nice metal pump and no parts to change when switching fuel types) but that is also reflected in the price.

Additional thoughts:

1) For most people a canister MSR pocket rocket is fine. Super compact, clean, light, and easy.

2) Once you go white gas.... its hard to take canisters seriously because in a liquid setup the fuel goes farther, is easier to come by, works better at high altitude & cold and just seems to put out more heat.

3) If you just want a "super duty reliable" and compact stove at a fairly low price check out the Whisperlight. If you need flame control, stability, and don't mind spending a few extra bucks the Dragonfly is the way to go. You will love it.

4) The Dragonfly does use a plastic pump (light weight / no corrosion is on the plus side). Pumps are expensive. Pumps can and do fail (see item 5 below). Protect your pump and consider a spare. If the plastic pump is a deal breaker take a look at the Optimus Nova but be ready to spend the $$$$ to get about the same performance.

5) RE: The stuff sack and wind screens....... ESBIT fuel tablets are light and reliable so buy a pack (cheap) as a backup just in case there is a stove failure or one stove isn't enough. A base for the tablets can be made using the Dragonfly windscreens . Don't use tablets on the stove because they leave a residue. Stuff the tablets in the sack with the stove. There is also enough room in the Dragonfly sack for a lighter, some matches, and maybe a soup or cocoa packet too.
LV NV / SD CA at REI on 08/08/2010

Awesome stove!

After using friends DragonFlys in the backcountry for years I finally got one for myself. I have used a cartridge stove (Not sure what brand, I've had it since I was a kid) and have always liked the liquid fuel stoves over the cartridge style due to their versatility and the fact that you can use a wind screen as well as the stability of this stove in particular.
The DragonFly is amazing in the winter time for melting snow and uses a very small amount of fuel for the job (over a hr. on high per 10oz of fuel) and takes no room in my giant winter pack. For summer, it's a bit bulky but I like the fact that you have solid heat control and can bring foods to a simmer (great for beans and rice based dishes).
In real world conditions the stats given by MSR are a bit unrealistic but here's what I have found to be the average; 45F outside with a 10-15mph breeze at just over 7,000 ft., you can bring 3 ½ cups of water to a rolling boil in right at 3min 45sec (by the way, it works great at altitude also, lighting right up at a bit over 12,000 ft.). I used a GSI tea kettle for these tests and this was consistently the numbers I got (give or take 10sec either side on average). These numbers were with the wind screen and reflector that are included with the stove. For small pots (narrow based solo sets for example) you will need to jerry-rig something to narrow down the pot stand (I use tent stakes propped between the legs and have had no issues with stability).
Now as far as the noise, it's true that it's pretty loud (reminds me of a small jet engine) but this is only the case when it's on full blast. When simmering the noise is on par with that of your typical liquid fuel stove. If you're looking for quite, go with an alcohol stove, if you want something that works with pretty much any pot and gives you the most control over the flame level (and a lot of heat when you need it), then this is the stove for you.
Mountainman Sam at REI on 02/02/2013

After using friends DragonFlys in the backcountry for years I finally got one for myself. I have used a cartridge stove (Not sure what brand, I've had it since I was a kid) and have always liked the liquid fuel stoves over the cartridge style due to their versatility and the fact that you can use a wind screen as well as the stability of this stove in particular.
The DragonFly is amazing in the winter time for melting snow and uses a very small amount of fuel for the job (over a hr. on high per 10oz of fuel) and takes no room in my giant winter pack. For summer, it's a bit bulky but I like the fact that you have solid heat control and can bring foods to a simmer (great for beans and rice based dishes).
In real world conditions the stats given by MSR are a bit unrealistic but here's what I have found to be the average; 45F outside with a 10-15mph breeze at just over 7,000 ft., you can bring 3 � cups of water to a rolling boil in right at 3min 45sec (by the way, it works great at altitude also, lighting right up at a bit over 12,000 ft.). I used a GSI tea kettle for these tests and this was consistently the numbers I got (give or take 10sec either side on average). These numbers were with the wind screen and reflector that are included with the stove. For small pots (narrow based solo sets for example) you will need to jerry-rig something to narrow down the pot stand (I use tent stakes propped between the legs and have had no issues with stability).
Now as far as the noise, it's true that it's pretty loud (reminds me of a small jet engine) but this is only the case when it's on full blast. When simmering the noise is on par with that of your typical liquid fuel stove. If you're looking for quite, go with an alcohol stove (which I also like), if you want something that works with pretty much any pot and gives you the most control over the flame level (and a lot of heat when you need it), then this is the stove for you.

Sam at Backcountry.com on 03/22/2013

Great base camp stove, perhaps more.

It met my expectations. They were: Compact; reliable; multi fuel; boil to simmer; very stable. I use the stove for car camping and wanted a stove to have when there are extreme weather issues, etc.

I have five different kinds of stoves: big and small; propane, white gas, multi file and iso-canister, etc. This is my favorite.

I have used the stove for a few years, a couple of times each year.

I have had none of the reliability issues mentioned with the pump, but the experience level is light. I have not used it with fuels other than white gas, but the change over is straight forward and any moderately technical person could do it. I have no intention of using multi files unless I absolutely have to. MSR notes that some files can cause excessive wear on the pun parts. In addition, white gas is so clean burning. (I will get a repair kit or extra pump to have around the house.) It simmers like my house stove and is very stable with large or small pots. I should also add it does well in high winds.

I like this stove so much I have thought about getting a second one. I like having hot water available when cooking and cleaning up and it would be a better alternative to a two burner stove. That being said, one is all you really need and it does not take up much space in a car. I much prefer it to a two burner table top stove.

If this is your first liquid file stove I recommend trying it at home (in the back yard or in the park). They are not hard to use, but some may not find them intuitive. I have observed that many people who have issues with liquid fuel stoves used them for the first time while on a camping trip.

I also recommend going to the MSR site and reading the PDF copies of the directions - and those of any competitor you are considering. I have noticed that in some, perhaps many cases, perceived shortcomings are outlined in the directions and recommended limitations.
erehwon at REI on 04/04/2012

Negative Reviews:

Works, but significant quality issues

I recently thru-hiked the Colorado Trail, a 500 mile route through the Rockies from Denver to Durango. The vast majority of the trail is above 10,000 feet, with frequent climbs to 13,000 and over. My average camp elevation was about 10,500 feet, highest was 12,500, and lowest was 6,000. Temps ranged from 80F near Denver & Durango, down to below freezing, probably 25-30F, at some spots. Average temperature was probably 40-45 at night and 60-65 during the day. This trip took me a solid 34 days of hiking to finish. It was a great test of all my equipment, and I thought I would share this knowledge here for the benefit of those considering the same equipment.

The Dragonfly is not a light stove, but not that heavy either. It fit perfectly with my mostly ultra-light setup, as I was cooking 2 meals a day for 2 people. I chose it for the multi-fuel ability, as I didn't want to depend on availability of butane canisters along the trail, or for future trips abroad. I used the 20oz MSR bottle, which for 2 people with 2 hot meals a day plus hot beverages, lasted an average of 10 days per 20oz fill, which is great in my opinion.

First the positive:
The stove worked brilliantly at the highest elevations and coldest temperatures and windiest conditions (with the windscreen). Poking my arms out of my sleeping bag to start the stove, with frost covering the bag and tarp around us, I was always happily surprised when the stove primed with the same ease as in warmer conditions.

The Dragonfly is simple and rather rugged, I can't say I'm the kindest handler of equipment, and it survived for the most part (see below).

It simmered just fine, although my stainless steel pot did tend to burn rather easily, but I've never had much luck with stainless steel.

And the negative:
I had my first stove for a couple months, using it casually on weekend backpacking trips. One of the major perks with this stove design is it's field serviceability, and I hadn't yet serviced it. So before the Colorado Trail hike I thought I better take it apart and clean it up. Sadly, the fuel jet had fused or otherwise became impossibly stuck to the threads inside the stove. Trying to get it unscrewed with the included service tool, I only managed to strip it. This basically defeated the idea of field serviceability.

I returned it for a new one before the trip, checking when I got home that this one was actually serviceable. This worked fine for the first 2 weeks of the trip, but suddenly I was having issues pressurizing the bottle. I took the pump apart, managing to strip the plastic fittings with the steel service tool in the process. Nothing major, but in the battle between stuck plastic and steel, steel wins (even with finesse). After opening it up, I found the rubber plunger, aka the pump cup, had partly corroded into flakes of rubber. This is only after 2 weeks of use (albeit continuous). I was able to finish the trail, but from then on the pressure was low and I was constantly on edge that the pump was going to fail again, not good when you're 120 miles from you're next resupply. Why they didn't include a spare pump cup in the service kit (which includes 2 o-rings, a spare fuel filter, lube, etc) I haven't the foggiest.

Finally, there are major inconsistencies when using different fuel types. The boil-times are nowhere near as consistent as printed on the box. In addition, some fuels gunk up the jets much faster than others and require completely different priming methods. I used white gas, unleaded gas, kerosene, and diesel, and while they all "worked", there are major differences (none of which are really commented on in the manual). White gas was the most consistent and cleanest, followed by diesel, kerosene, and then unleaded gas. Unleaded gas was dirty as hell, took almost twice as long to get a boil, clogged the jet constantly, and flamed up a lot. I would not recommend using it unless you have no other option (which I didn't).

One last complaint is that there was always fuel left in the pump coupling and hose, which inevitably leaked onto the bottle, my hands, the stove, or other outlying regions. After a month of this, my pack and everything the bottle and the stove touched ended up reeking of diesel and kerosene. It's enough to offend everyone that passes you with your 10-day unwashed body odor, but to add diesel fumes in with the mix, that's just wrong.

PS. Don't even think of having a quiet conversation while burning this stove. Like most that use this design, it's really loud. The sound might be comforting for those of you that work with jet engines.

I've sinced returned the stove and ordered the Optimus Nova, also from REI (online only). The Nova uses a similar design but opted for a rugged aluminum pump. The cheap pump is the ultimate reason I returned the stove and gave it 2 stars instead of maybe 3. If that cheap plastic (or rubber pump cup) breaks in the field, you're not going to be able to service it.
MAVanWey at REI on 09/09/2009

Love and hate.

I love gas stoves in that if there is any left over fuel, it can be placed back into the tank.

The flame adjustment is great.

The problems. As with all MSR white gas stoves it suffers from reliability. Especially the pump. It will break, so don't take it out on a multiday hike deep into the woods. Also, the pump is not compatible with other MSR stoves, even if someone has a spare, unless its specifically for a dragon it will not work. My pump broke in multiple areas.

Good news, MSR does sell a lot of repair kits for their stoves. They also sell spare pumps. A sign they their repair business may be doing well. Kind of like a Ford vehicle.

Other problems - many have reported, including myself, the wick portion of the stove broke off easily. My wick break off after only about 3 hours of use. I repaired it best I could.

Another problem is the noise. In a group the noise will definately annoy people. Its sounds like a small jet plane.

I still keep it in case I want to use it on day hikes and overnights, but I would be considerate enough not to take it on group trips.

Finally, the price, I am not sure what merits MSR stoves to be so expensive. Its just a simple stove and nothing exceptional in terms of quality and design.
TheObserver at REI on 01/01/2009

Cheap Plastic

I got my mom to buy me this stove in the US because it is much cheaper than here in Europe. The guy in the shop told her to rather buy two fuel pumps because they break all the time. So she bought two pumps. I will be cycling through Africa and therefore need a reliable stove. When I got the stove I tried to do some of the maintenance work that is described in the manual just to familiarize myself with the stove. In the process I managed to break one of the pumps. The plastic thread that the metal control valve assembly screw on broke off. I thus managed to break the pump without even using it once. Another problem is that the jet was so tight that I couldnt unscrew it without bending the provided tool. Other people have even broken their stove trying to loosen the jet (this is necessary for cleaning and is recommended maintenance job). Very very unhappy!
NomadOn2Wheels at REI on 08/08/2010

Finicky, then self-destructed

I bought this as a replacement for a trusty Whisperlight, figuring the simmering feature was worth the extra expense. I used the Dragonfly for only three or four short backpack trips. Over that time it had to be disassembled and cleaned every few days of use. Finally, on the first night of a planned 4-day trip, it developed a fuel leak at the hose connection to the pump, caught fire, and melted the plastic pump to a misshapen lump before I could get it put out. Luckily, it didn't explode. I see that MSR sells an "annual maintenance kit" for $15 that they recommend using that might have avoided this. I'm sorry, but a backpacking stove should not require $15 of maintenance for every year of use.
CAHiker99 at REI on 09/09/2009

Low heat output

I just finished a three week trip in the Arctic. This stove was among four on our trip. It was new for this trip. It did not have enough heat output to boil more than small quantities of water (more than two and a half quarts, I'd say). We tried cleaning it and (obviously) running it at full blast. Still no boil. By comparison, each of the other three stoves (an older MSR white gas stove and two canister stoves) was able to boil the same quantity of water just fine. Such an expensive stove should be able to boil moderate quantities of water alongside older and less expensive models; this one can't.
T W M at REI on 09/09/2010

big bulky, just doesnt kick it

This is by far the worst stove I have tried yet, I have packed for 16+ days with this stove and others and have done gear assessments for a backpacking program where hundreds of students have used this stove and their rxn is the same. I think MSR puts out a lot of good products this just isnt their best. its bulky, there have been a lot of problems with the bell in the middle, there are easier stoves to light. The fuel versatility is nice but you can do pretty well with the whisperlight international plus Ive cooked on the WSL Int for 12+ people and spilled nary a bean.
longjohn silver at REI on 07/07/2008

Like a Fiat, runs great when it runs

Carried an Optimus 99 for 3 decades. The 99 fired every time from -15 F on Mt Washington, NH to +100 in GA summer but I decided to upgrade to a 'modern' stove. MSR has great reputation, but I found the stove to be bulky to pack and temperamental to operate. After less than a dozen trips, it failed to light at all. Found out later the tiny 1/8 inch fuel filter was clogged. I have to trust my gear and I no longer trust the MSR. Going back to Optimus.
canoe builder at REI on 09/09/2010

It Broke

I bought this years back as a backup stove and never used it. Last week I tried to fire it up and the pump plunger came out due to the fact the pump body broke. ! So, the first time I try to use it and it breaks and I am up the creek!
Chris Montana at REI on 10/10/2008

reliable, but noisy

I've used mine several times and bought it for the multi-fuel option. It's got a strong folding base/holder and reliable operation, but it's so noisy I'm selling mine. If you're into "low impact" camping, this is not the stove for you. Works like a champ, but scares away the birds and other animals.
back2basics at REI on 01/01/2008

Pump is Junk

I've had nothing but trouble with the pump. It has broken on me 3 different times. I've replaced numerous parts and it broke again on the last trip.
The pump is plastic and plain junk.
solotrips at REI on 11/11/2008

Neutral Reviews:

NOT THAT IMPRESSED

If this review was based on the MSR customer service I would give it 5 stars but since it's on the product I think 3 stars is being kind. I purchased this product to take on a three week car camping trip since I would not take my Coleman stove on the plane. I didn't have any real big problems lighting the stove and it worked fine the first and second time however on the third night I couldn't pressurize the fuel tank because the pump would not go down. It was Sunday so I had to go without my dinner. The next morning I called MSR and they were great. Over the phone they tried to walk me thru taking the pump apart but I wasn't able to do it so they found a service store at my next stop that could help me and if necessary replace the pump. The employee at the store were great and after a few minutes of struggling they were able to take the pump apart and put it back together. The rep mentioned the rubber end of the pump was pretty frayed for a new pump but after testing it several times it seemed to work so we both just shrugged it off and I left happy. That night the stove worked great and I continued on my trip unfortunately the night the pump stopped working and no matter how many times I took it apart it wouldn't pump easily and I noticed that the rubber part was frayed more. I was hungry so I kept trying with no success. The next day I had to pull camp a day early so I could drive to the next city ( 40 minutes away) to call MSR. I explained my previous problem to the new rep and let them know that I would like the part replaced unfortunately for me the only store that carried my stoves pump was an hour away. To make sure I didn't have any problems MSR called the store first to make sure they had the pump in stock and to explain my situation. After everything was settled they called me back to let me know that the pump was on hold and all I had to do was trade in my pump for the new one. Thank god they did too because when I picked up the pump the store employee let me know it was the only one they had!! Picking up the replacement part was easy, I gave them my name and they gave me the new pump. That was it. Thankfully, the new pump worked great for the rest of the trip but I still have reservations about the stove. I had to change my plans because of the stove and I went two night without dinner because of it. I can't say that the stove ruined the first part of my trip but it definitely put a damper on it and caused stress on what should have been a relaxing time. That said the MSR customer service was great I told them the stove was new and they took me at my word they didn't hassle me about a receipt or ask me to jump thru any hoops. They were very professional and helpful even offering to look up the directions to the stores. Honestly, the only reason why I haven't returned the stove was because of the great service I received from MSR. I purchased this stove because of the great reviews and I'm sure I just got a lemon but for anyone looking to buy this stove I would recommend buying a replacement pump just in case.
Slow Hiker at REI on 06/06/2013

Good; But Has Problems

While many detailed reviews have been written on this stove, after hard core field testing of this stove for over a year now, a few points need to be made:

1. The strong points of this stove are the excellent simmer control, and the variety of liquid fuels that can be used.

2. The boil time for white gas published by MSR is inaccurate. Rather than the 3.5 minutes as claimed, it is closer to 5 or 5.5 minutes. I have tested this on 2 separate Dragonfly stoves, at around 5200 feet altitude. This is odd, as MSR has accurate figures for their other stoves which I have also tested (Wind Pro and Reactor).

3. Maintenance is a real issue. You must follow the instructions for keeping the stove clean and lubricated. It does require dissasembly of small parts and such. All tools are provided, but you will have to purchase the Maintenance Kit which costs $35 probably each year.

4. It is a hassle to light, requiring priming with liquid fuel.

I really like being able to simmer, so this feature is worth it to me to have the stove. I can cook eggs, fish and such with no problems. However, for most people, the propane-powed Windpro is probably a better choice as it requires no maintenance. It actually boils water in 4 minutes, can simmer as well as the Dragonfly, and is 7 ounces lighter. You give up the ability to use various liquid fuels, and I would not use propane in the winter or much below freezing.

For winter use, this is a good stove, and for traveling where you need to be able to use local fuel like Kerosene.
Idahohikker at REI on 08/08/2011

finicky

The Dragonfly is basically a version of the XGK that simmers. These two MSR stoves are wonderful and on any trip longer than a few days they are more efficient than any other type of stove (the only drawback is they are loud). I owned an XGK for 20 years and it never let me down. Unfortunately, to do the trick of simmering, the Dragonfly has a much smaller fuel tube than the XGK, plus it has two valves with very small passages in them, and my Dragonfly has now failed me twice on separate snow camping trips (once in very cold conditions, the other not). On both occasions, complete field overhaul of the stove was not enough to make it work.

The Dragonfly requires very clean fuel -- the factory rep at Cascade Designs recommended 1) I should not use Coleman fuel at high altitude because it contains paraffin that gets denser when cold and clogs the intake filter (the intake filter can be removed, but not without destroying it) and 2) I should not use ANY fuel that's over a couple of months old. He recommended only using MSR's Super-fuel, and also mentioned that the Dragonfly doesn't work well on gas.

In summary, I would recommend the Dragonfly for trips where absolute reliability is NOT essential, but if you're going on an adventure into an extreme high-alpine or polar environment where you are planning to totally rely on your stove for melting water or cooking, save yourself from unhappiness and go with the XGK.
genghiskhan at REI on 08/08/2011

Should be called the DragonRoar

Previously I've used the MSR SimmerLite when backpacking and Kayak camping. One several trips, I've either wanted to do pancakes or simmer a stew. With my old stove I didnt have the fine control to do this without some scorchage.

Thus I was recommended the DragonFly. I must say it does have that great control over the flame. Very nice. Also, I was able to boil water (about 1 liter) very quickly. I just had to turn up the value and release the dragon.

My one complaint and the reason I returned it was because of the sound. This stove is very loud. When camping in GNP, one person commented that "Boy, you'll never hear the bear sneaking up on you with that one." But then again, the noise would probably scare it away anyhow.
Mountains R Calling at REI on 09/09/2007

Excellent cooking/Hard on the ears

Bring your earplugs when using this stove to boil! I have used this stove at least 6 trips a year for the last 4 years and have enjoyed the excellent simmer capabilities. However, the loudness while cooking on "high" often left me off by myself because you can't talk over the flame. It is "jet engine" loud. Our group experienced 2 unexplainable flame ups while cooking last summer on our Trans-Sierra/Whitney trip. I found that I have been using my Snow Peak Giga Power stove more often, and have just purchased the Brunton Vapor AF stove (when liquid fuel is desired), hopeful for quieter cooking adventures.
Stanski at REI on 11/11/2007

Conversation stopper

If you really are a gourmet, I guess this is the stove for you. This stove has a true simmer, but that's about all it has going for it, unless you're going to be using it very high up.

On the downside, this stove roars like a jet engine. Maybe some people who think in the lines of "Man vs. Nature" like that, but in practice, it's annoying to other people and prevents a conversation from happening anywhere nearby. If all you're cooking is rice and noodles, you'd be happier with something else.
Nasty Old Goat at REI on 09/09/2007

gave it up after 5 years

Have used for over 5 years, all Pro's reported by others are true. I like to cook "gourmet", not boil water for pre-packaged meals. The "Dragon" name is appropriate;this stove sounds like a jet engine at med. or high heat. You don't want to have to listen to it for 20 minutes.Burner area small, difficult to cook in large pans w/o scourching unless food is very liquid.
GSL at REI on 10/10/2007

amazing

i used this with kerosene so i cant say anything about other fuels but this thing was amazing. compact but also very stable and simple compared to other liquid fuel stoves. also i was very pleased with the boil time because under 5 minutes i had 1.5 liters of water boiling. the one downfall is that it was LOUD! overall amasing.
eat sleep hike at REI on 04/04/2010

Despite the pictures, this does not come with a fuel bottle, it's just the stove head. You need to buy a bottle for it.
This is twice now that Backcountry.com has not delivered on what is pictured for me.

drep530712 at Backcountry.com on 05/23/2013